What Are Triglycerides?

Triglycerides are a type of fat also known as “lipids in blood. Triglyceride is an ester derived from glycerol and three fatty acids (from tri- and glyceride). Triglycerides are the main constituents of body fat in humans and other animals, as well as vegetable fat They are also present in the blood to enable the bidirectional transference of adipose fat and blood glucose from the liver, and are a major component of human skin oils Body converts extra calories especially from food such as pastries white bread, candy, sugar, oil, margarine, butter and alcohol into triglycerides and stores them in fat cells. Triglycerides play an important role in metabolism as energy sources and transporters of dietary fat. They contain more than double energy (approximately 9 kcal/g or 38 kJ/g) as carbohydrates (approximately 4 kcal/g or 17 kJ/g)

In the human body high levels of triglycerides have been linked to atherosclerosis, risk of heart disease and stroke. However, the relative negative impact of raised levels of triglycerides compared to that of LDL: HDL ratios is as yet unknown. The risk can be partly accounted for by a strong inverse relationship between triglyceride level and HDL-cholesterol level.

Triglycerides & Cholesterol are known as lipids but only triglycerides are fats. Cholesterol is a waxy substance made by liver and intestines that helps make cell membranes and hormones. It also helps body to digest food. Body uses them to transfer and store energy for later use. But higher level of bad LDL) cholesterol can raise risk of heart disease.

The levels of good (HDL) cholesterol bad (LDL) cholesterol and triglycerides in blood can be measured by Blood Test known as Lipid Profile. Desirable: Less than 150 mg/dL (1.7 mmol/L)
Borderline high: 150 to 199 mg/dL (1.7-2.2 mmol/L) High: 200 to 499 mg/dL (2.3-5.6 mmol/L)
Very high: 500 mg/dL or greater (5.6 mmol/L)

These levels are tested after fasting 8 to 12 hours. Triglyceride levels remain temporarily higher for a period after eating.

The American Heart Association recommends an optimal triglyceride level of 100 mg/dL (1.1 mmol/L) or lower to improve heart health.

For people with mildly or moderately high levels of triglycerides lifestyle changes including weight loss, exercise moderate exercise and dietary modification are recommended. This may include restriction of carbohydrates (specifically fructose) and fat in the diet and the consumption of omega-3 fatty acids from algae, nuts, and seeds. The decision to treat hypertriglyceridemia with medication depends on the levels and on the presence of other risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

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Breast Cancer Awareness Seminar

The mission of ParamCARE foundation is to build ‘Healthy America’ in which all the citizens, irrespective of their background, heritage, socioeconomic status, current state of disease or wellbeing should live healthier, happier, active, longer lives with enhanced cultural and social values for the wellness of societies and the country.

ParamCARE Foundation promotes strategies and activities to enhance the health quality and literacy in communities in a culturally sensitive manner. We outreach the people through educational & awareness seminars for healthy life style, chronic disease and cancer awareness and prevention, holistic approach for healthy life etc.

We have supported ‘Breast Cancer Awareness Seminar” to raise awareness regarding breast health, breast cancer and importance of early screening mammogram, at 200 Middlesex Essex Tpk. Iselin, on March 15, 2018.

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National Kidney Awareness Month

National Kidney Awareness

The National Kidney Awareness Day (March, 14) is dedicated to the awareness, risk factors, prevention and treatment of kidney disease for hundreds of thousands of healthcare professionals, millions of patients and their families, and tens of millions of Americans at risk.

About The Kidneys:

The kidneys are two, fist-sized organs in lower back of the body. They maintain overall health through the following functions:

  • Kidneys filter about 200 liters of blood each day and remove waste out of the body.
  • Regulating of the body’s salt, potassium and acid content.
  • Help to regulate blood pressure.
  • Removing of drugs from the body.
  • Balancing the body’s fluids.
  • Releasing hormones that regulate blood pressure.
  • Producing an active form of vitamin D that promotes strong, healthy bones.
  • Controlling the production of red blood cells.

Quick Facts on Kidney Disease:

  • Kidneys are also prone to disease.
  • About 1 in 3 Americans is at risk for kidney disease due to diabetes, high blood pressure or a family history of kidney failure.
  • More than 30 million Americans have kidney disease, and most don’t know it because there are often no symptoms until the disease has progressed.
  • There are over 95,000 people waiting for kidney transplants.
  • More than 590,000 people have kidney failure in the US today.
  • Kidney disease is the 9th leading cause of death in the country.
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Brain Nutrition

Nutrition Tips for Brain

Nutrition influences the proper functioning of brain and affects mood problem. Optimizing diet with nutritionally, metabolically and biochemically balanced food and supplemental nutrients, is one of the most important factors in keeping brain functions healthy and mood steady.

  • Create meals high in low-glycemic legumes such as lentils, chickpeas and soybeans. These foods slow the release of sugars into the bloodstream, helping to prevent excess insulin release leading to insulin resistance and its related health concerns, including depression, dementia, obesity and high blood pressure.
  • Eat fresh fruits and vegetables rich in phytonutrients, carotenoids, flavonoids and polyphenols, associated with a lower incidence of nearly all health problems, including dementia, obesity and aging.
  • Use more slow-burning, low-glycemic vegetables such as asparagus, broccoli, kale, spinach, cabbage and Brussels sprouts.
  • Berries, cherries, peaches, plums, rhubarb, pears and apples are optimal fruits; cantaloupes and melons, grapes, and kiwifruit are suitable, though they contain more sugar.
  • A diet high in fiber further helps to stabilize blood sugar by slowing carbohydrate absorption, and it supports a healthy digestive tract. Try to gradually increase fiber to 30 to 50 grams a day, and use predominantly soluble or viscous fiber (legumes, nuts, seeds, whole grains, vegetables and fruit), which slows sugar absorption from the gut.
  • Minimize starchy, high-glycemic cooked vegetables, such as potatoes, corn and root vegetables, such as rutabagas, parsnips and turnips.
  • Beans or legumes, including whole, traditional soy products, nuts (almonds, walnuts, macadamia nuts, pecans), seeds (pumpkin, sunflower, flax, chia)
  • To deal with anxiety, depression and memory problems, healthy foods including a wide array of fats, proteins, carbs and special nutrients, physical and mental exercises may help to feel comfort along with other intervention.
  • Glucose: Glucose provides steady energy to the brain. Whole grains are a good source of glucose.
  • Omega-3-Fats: Omega-3-Fats are important for healthy brain functions. The major Sources for these Fats are from Animal Source: fish is the main source in animal kingdom e.g. Salmon, Trout, and Sardines. Plant Source: Flaxseed, Soya beans, Pumpkin seeds, Walnuts.
  • Lycopene: Evidence suggests that lycopene is a powerful antioxidant which helps to protect against damage to cells which occurs in the development of dementia, particularly Alzheimer’s. E.g. Tomato is good source of lycopene
  • Vitamin C: Vitamin C protect against age-related brain degeneration. The best source of Vitamin C are blackcurrants, Amla (Indian gooseberry), broccoli etc.
  • Vitamin E: A study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology suggests that a good intake of Vitamin E might help to prevent cognitive decline, particularly in the elderly. Nuts are a good source of vitamin E. E.g.: Walnuts, Almonds, and Hazelnuts etc
  • Minerals: valuable minerals like Zinc and Magnesium, which is vital for enhancing memory and thinking skills. Pumpkin seeds supply needed minerals, B vitamins, and tryptophan, which are the precursor to the good mood chemical serotonin.
  • Exercise: Exercise helps to keep our brain sharp. Research suggests that regular exercise improves cognitive function, slows down the mental aging process and helps to process information more effectively.

References: ,

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dehydration symptoms


Dehydration is a deficit of total body water, with an accompanying disruption of metabolic processes. Dehydration takes place when body loses more fluid than person drink. When too much water is lost from the body, the organs, cells, and tissues fail to function as they should, which can lead to dangerous complications. Dehydration can cause hypernatremia (high levels of sodium ions in the blood) and is distinct from hypovolemia (loss of blood volume, particularly plasma).

Higher Risk People:

  • workers exposed to excessive amounts of heat (for example, welders, landscapers, construction workers, and mechanics)
  • seniors
  • individuals with chronic illnesses
  • athletes (especially runners, cyclists, and soccer players)
  • infants and young children
  • people who reside in high altitudes

Dehydration occurs when water intake is not enough to replace free water lost due to normal physiologic processes, including breathing, urination, and perspiration, or other causes, including diarrhea and vomiting. It also, occurs when free water loss exceeds free water intake, usually due to exercise, disease, or high environmental temperature. Mild dehydration can also be caused by immersion diuresis, which may increase risk of decompression sickness in divers.
Sweating: is part of your body’s natural cooling process. When you become hot, your sweat glands activate to release moisture from your body in an attempt to cool it off. Sweating also hydrates your skin and maintains the balance of electrolytes in your body.
Illness: Illnesses that cause continuous vomiting or diarrhea can result in dehydration. Important electrolytes are also lost through these processes.
Fever: In fever, your body loses fluid through your skin’s surface in an attempt to lower your temperature.
Urination: Urination is the body’s normal way to release toxins from your body. If you don’t replace the fluid lost through excessive urination, you run the risk of developing
Symptoms of Dehydration:
Most people can tolerate a three to four percent decrease in total body water without difficulty or adverse health effects. A five to eight percent decrease can cause fatigue and dizziness. Loss of over ten percent of total body water can cause physical and mental deterioration, accompanied by severe thirst. Death occurs at a loss of between fifteen and twenty-five percent of the body water. Mild dehydration is characterized by thirst and general discomfort and is usually resolved with oral rehydration.
Dehydration can be life-threatening when severe and lead to seizures or respiratory arrest, and also carries the risk of osmotic cerebral edema if rehydration is overly rapid Symptoms of mild to moderate dehydration include:

  • dry mouth
  • increased thirst
  • decreased urination
  • dry skin
  • constipation
  • dizziness
  • lightheadedness
  • headache

Severe dehydration is likely to cause the following:

  • excessive thirst
  • lack of sweat production
  • low blood pressure
  • rapid heart rate
  • rapid breathing
  • fever
  • sunken eyes
  • shriveled skin

References: ,

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